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Sample Drama Game 3

CONCENTRATION GAMES

SAMPLE GAME: WHAT’S THAT SMELL?

Concentration drama games challenge the students observation skills, teach them to use all their senses and of course, require concentration. Again these are good games if you have a restricted space to work in. Easy to play in a normal classroom.

The sample game, What’s That Smell? does require a bit of preparation, but you can always engage the class in this preparation, they tend to love searching for different items to use. In the kit, Top 50 Drama Games Unpacked, What’s That Sound? requires a similar amount of preparation, and again the students love to play a part, The other drama games in this section are Total Recall, No Questions Please, and Banned Word.

WHAT’S THAT SMELL? Free drama game  sample 3

BASIC DESCRIPTION

The first part of this game involves several lidded jars which contain objects with distinct smells inside them. Students sit in a circle and are given a jar each. They close their eyes or are blindfolded and open the jar, then focus on the smell. Go around the circle getting them to describe the smell, what it reminds them of, if it’s pleasant or not etc without naming what they think it is. They re-lid the jar and pass the jars around the circle half a dozen places. They repeat the smelling and describing. They pass two more times, so they end up smelling four different jars. At the end they write down what they think was in their four jars. Check answers.

SMELLY SCENE

The second part involves using some of their “scents” in an improvised scene. Students pair up or get into groups of three and using one or more of the scents on their lists they create a short scene. In the scene the players need to be affected by the smell, or the smell causes a change in the storyline in some way. The scent is a focal point of the scene.

HELPFUL HINTS

With younger students it is a good idea to prepare with a lesson on smells, favourite smells, worst smells ever, all the things they sniffed this morning, words to describe smells etc.

With older students, sometimes they like to bring the jar in with their chosen scent. Remind them it can’t be offensive or toxic. Check jars so no unwelcome surprises. Check children with allergies and to make sure all scents are non-toxic. With the improvisation, offer examples to start them off “wake up and you can smell smoke so you realise there is a fire in the house” or it’s burnt toast so dad must be making breakfast.

LIST OF IDEAS

Scents they could be put in sealed jars are listed. Good idea place most in the jar close to the class time and a few just before class so smells are fresh. Don’t need a lot in the jar, often a spoonful suffices.

POSSIBLE JAR CONTENTS

Pieces of chocolate

Peanut butter

Rosemary sprigs

Hot chips

Freshly baked cookie or cake

Apple juice

Aftershave or perfume on a card

Candle wax

Antiseptic cream

Deep Heat

Cloves

Soy Sauce

Licorice/ black jelly beans

Celery pieces

Tropical Sunscreen

Pool water (chlorinated)

Pencil shavings

Ground coffee beans

Tea bag

Coconut pieces

Blue vein cheese

Fresh soil

Lemon rind

 

Banana (mashed)

Vanilla essence

New leather (scrap piece)

Fried onions

Gum leaves

Lavender sprig

Corn chips

Jasmine flowers

Baby powder

Cut grass

Mothballed cloth

Tomato sauce

Buttered popcorn

Sawdust

Fairy floss

Vicks Vapor Rub

Body odour on a piece of cloth

Prawn

Curry powder

Mouldy old damp cloth

Crystallised ginger

Chicken soup

Newspaper

Sardines

Dust from vacuum cleaner

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